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architizer:

We want to live in this classic renovation of the historic W.H. Ives Tailor Building from 1889. Read more here.

Source: architizer
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cjwho:

Casa C, Reckingen by Camponovo Baumgartner Architekten | via

The onehundred year old Casa C is located in the village center of Reckingen, vis-à-vis the church. The barn consists of two units. Each of them comprehends a barn in the basement and a space fort he hay on the floor above.

Due to new animal protection laws, the owner had to close down the barn. A new construction instead of the old building was not possible because it is part of the ancient village center and a protected monument. Therefore the task was to convert the barn whitout destroing its outer facade.

The new weekend house was conceived as a building inside the hay spaces. The inner facade detaches twice from the outer shell. Thus, two non-heated alcoves are developped, one in each hay space. The old wood-structure and the haystack can be seen there.

The holiday unit itself consists of a ondulating living space with different places to stay. The historic wall in the middle oft he house is cut-off twice. A spiral parcours over two floors arises. Along this path, the space widens to a living room, a dining room, a library and a working place. and offers great views tot he mountains. The sleeping rooms are joint as baies and niches to the living space. The doors and the cupboards are integrated into the walls.

The construction consists entirely of wood. The floor is made of native larch , the walls and ceillings are made of qualititive birch inlay. The roof is newly covered with larch shingles. All the surfaces are untreted and exposed to natural deterioration.

Photography: José Hevia

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Source: cjwho
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cjwho:

B House, Berrocal, Segovia, Spain by ch+qs arquitectos | via

This is a humanized landscape of meadows, walls, ash, streams, a small-scale landscape, minimal, almost domestic, and where absolutely everything has yellow accents. In spring poke all yellow flowers. In the summer, the cereal, harvest, and the Castilian heat are yellow.
Fall only comes here in yellow ash, millions of tiny leaves that die in a lingering and dry yellow. In winter, yellow insists in glowing flashes of yellow lichen on the gray trunks of ash trees. And here the machines are yellow, the signs are yellow, all is yellow.

We bought a meadow in this landscape 15 years ago, and after 12 years of yellow contemplation, we decided to build a house there, a refuge, a piece of landscape as a frame, a small inhabited threshold with two views, east and west.

To the west, a nearby view of rocks, moss, brambles and ancient ash. And to the east, the distant dawn over the yellow mountains. This double view and the body finished the design of the house. Everything is small, everything is short, everything has a tiny scale. From outside, the view slides over the house:

The eye only stops at a yellow gate guarding the doorway, and a yellow chimney that warms it, the rest is invisible.
And when sitting, stopping in the doorway, the house disappears and the world continues in yellow.

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Source: cjwho
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nnmprv:

HOUSE IN ASAKUSA: Yasushi Horibe, Tokyo, 2006 (by wakiiii)

(via kureator)

Source: flickr.com
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dailybungalow:

1930::Practical Homes on Flickr.

Frame and Stucco

Jens Pedersen, Architect

Source: dailybungalow